Scan to the Future – 3d Laser Scan of Something Out There!

Q: Name something that stops traffic ?

Is It A Skull ?

Is It A Skull ?

An attractive member of the opposite sex? a 3D Laser Scanner? an attractive member of the same sex (for some!)….or what about a low level missile shaped craft cruising through the roads of Wolverhampton? …Wolverhampton you say?

Yes! and it is happening right now and guess what, we’ve made contact with the craft’s inhabitant! Namely Ian Fardoe, one of the UK’s top exponents of the Velomobile – a bullet shaped human powered bicycle car! It is where human power, fitness, fuel saving and shear-thrill all conspire to undermine the domination and arrogance of the car driver whilst catching the eye of all that she passes.

“You simply can not take your eye off a Velo as it accelerates missile-style along the highway and into the distance.”

Graham Everitt, MD, Electronic Architecture Ltd. London.

3d Laser Scan of the Velo

3d Laser Scan - Plan View of the Velomobile

With his reclined sturdy frame and barely visible ‘pilots’ head, Ian has been powering his aerodynamic shell for over ten years. His viking physique is proof of what you have to be and what you can be when you choose human power and excitement over the petrol pump and congestion. And the Velo’s popularity is increasing from a specialist, early-adopter market.

Once we managed to persuade Ian to actually stop, Electronic Architecture (EA) carried out 3D Laser Scans of the back-to-the-future craft as the bespoke shell is undergoing aerodynamic analysis with CAD software.

Electronic Architecture (EA) provide 3D Laser Scanning services and Measured Architectural Surveys for a range of clients including Architects, Interior Designers, Structural Engineers, Contractors and Property Developers.

But what actually is it? Well, the Velo aficionados went back to the bicycle pedal-and-chain mechanism and then shrouded the 200 year-old ‘walking machine’ invention with a sexy, futuristic aerodynamic fibreglass shell and then learnt to fly it! Ian and his dedicated peers are rediscovering the adventure and virtues of cycling, whilst experiencing the benefits of self-powered mobility and the great outdoors.

Back to the Future - 3d Laser Scan of Velo

Back to the Future - 3d Laser Scan of the Velo

Some might say the Velo is only for the brave. After all, imagine cycling at 30mph alongside a 4×4 in nothing more than a low-level plastic cigar?!

On the other hand, the Velo is a cool, thrilling way of life. But no one broke new ground without being brave.

Velo Uber Alles.

3d Laser Scan Captures Charm of Grade II Listed Hall

3d Laser Scan of Front Elevation

3d Laser Scan of Front Elevation

Standing within 22.5 acres of mature Derbyshire grounds and offering superb views across the Derwent Valley, a Grade II listed country house provided the perfect location for a spot of 3d laser scanning.

EA were commissioned to produce a full measured building survey of the property, which was once modestly described by the architectural historian Sir Nikolaus Pevsner (1902-83) as ‘quite stately’. EA utilised both total station and 3d laser scanner technology to ensure a high level of detail and accuracy.

Full plans, sections and elevations were provided in AutoCAD format. The fine exterior and interior detailing was extracted from the 3d laser scan models.

3d Laser Scan of Drawing Room Ceiling

3d Laser Scan of Drawing Room Ceiling

3d Laser Scan of Reflected Ceiling

3d Laser Scan of Reflected Ceiling

The external 3d laser scan images capture the fine fenestration and exceptional detail of the Palladian architecture to the principle elevations.

While the exterior is impressively handsome, the interior hides all the Rococo charm.

3d Laser Scan of Gibbon's Mantel Piece

3d Laser Scan of Gibbon's Mantel Piece

In particular, the drawing room is adorned with wood carvings, theatrical ceiling and a splendid mantelpiece by the master wood carver, Grinling Gibbons (1648-1721).

Gibbons was considered by many to be the finest wood carver of all. Indeed, Gibbons was employed by such eminent and noble dignitaries as Sir Christopher Wren and King Charles II for work on St Paul’s Cathedral and Windsor Castle respectively.

Electric Counterpoint – 3d Laser Scan of the Young Dancer

Plazzotta's The Young Dancer

Plazzotta's The Young Dancer

The Young Dancer is a bronze sculpture by Venice born Enzo Plazzotta (1921 – 1981), which gracefully sits opposite the Zizzi restaurant off Bow Street, near to the Royal Opera House.

The 3d laser scan viewed here as a grey scale image, demonstrates Plazzotta’s ability to capture both the delicate frame and supple agility of the ballerina.

Detail View of 3d Laser Scan

Detail View of 3d Laser Scan

The poised right foot and defined calf is also a gentle reminder how dedicated and devoted ballerinas are to their art while suggesting the girl may be about to dance rather than rest.

Plazzotta was born in Mestre, near Venice and spent the majority of his working life in London, while becoming fascinated with the study of movement. This passion for movement may well have been due to his Italian heritage and influenced by Futurism, an art and social movement which originated in Italy in the early 20th century.

However, one can not ignore the influence of Degas in the delicate handling of the Impressionist’s celebrated subject matter.

Many of Plazzotta bronzes adorn the streets of London, which EA intend on laser scanning in good time.

Young Dancer From Above

Young Dancer From Above

Pump Up The (Water) Volume – 3d Laser Scan of Pump Station

Smethwick Pump Station

3d Laser Scan of Smethwick Pump Station

In May 1779, manufacturer Mathew Boulton (1728 – 1809) and Engineer James Watt (1736 – 1809) combined to create the Smethwick Steam Engine. Originally one of two engines used to pump water back up to the 491 ft summit level of the BCN Old Main Line (Birmingham) canal at Smethwick, located near the Soho Foundry where it was constructed. A second engine was located at the opposite end of the summit level in Spon Lane.

The engines were required as local water sources were inadequate in supplying the necessary water required to operate the six locks either side of the canal’s original summit.

Smethwick Pump Station

The 3d Laser Scan Creates Unique Views of the Pump Station

In the 1820s, Thomas Telford designed and constructed a new lower level canal parallel to the existing one, creating at the time the largest man-made earthworks in the world. This lower level canal was spanned by the Galton Bridge.

Despite both of these developments, the engines were still required, and Thomas Telford constructed the Engine Arm Aqueduct carrying the Engine Arm branch canal over his New Main Line in order for coal to be transported along the arm to feed the Smethwick Engine.

In 1892, the original Smethwick Engine was deemed uneconomic to operate and maintain and so a new replacement engine was constructed in a new pumping house (now Grade II listed) located next to Brasshouse Lane, which now forms part of the nearby Galton Valley Canal Museum.

Smethwick Pump Station

The Black Circles Indicate the Positions of the Laser Scanner

The original Smethwick Engine, which is the oldest working engine in the world, was firstly relocated to British Waterways Ocker Hill depot where it remained until being acquired by Birmingham City Council. The engine is now sited at the Thinktank Science Museum at Millennium Point in Birmingham and is the oldest working engine in the world.

The original engine house was demolished in 1897. Its original site and foundations can still be seen on Bridge Street North in Smethwick, just north of the junction with Rolfe Street.

EA have carefully 3d laser scanned the existing grade II listed Pump Station so The Black Country now have a 3d computer model archive of this historical industrial building.

A Day at the Beech – 3d Laser Scan of 100 yr old Tree

3d laser scan of beech tree

3d Laser Scan of Beech Tree - Over View

EA Laser scanning have produced the only 3d laser scan model of an iconic beech tree, which used to welcome visitors from the edge of St Benedict Biscop Church grounds as they travelled into the South Staffordshire village of Wombourne.

Sadly, the beech has since been felled due to contracting Meripilus Giganteus, however these unique images taken from the 3d model, celebrate the peace and strength that this much loved beech brought to the village community for over a century. By virtue of laser scanning the beech, EA Laser Scanning have the only archive in the form the 3d laser scan model.

3d laser scan of beech tree

3d Laser Scan - View from Kerb

3d laser scan of beech tree

3d Laser Scan - Beech Sliced in Half

3d Laser Scan - View from Road

3d Laser Scan - View from Road

No Bridge Too Far – 3d Laser Scan of Suicide Bridge

EA Laser Scanning of Suicide Bridge

EA Laser Scanning of Suicide Bridge

Spanning the busy A1, the famous North London Archway Bridge was surveyed from central reservation level without disturbing the traffic flow with EA Laser Scanning.

Archway bridge, which dates back to 1897, replaced John Nash’s original 1813 structure, thereby maintaining the link between the villages of Highgate and Crouch End. By laser scanning from remote positions EA were able to capture the cast iron structural detail, retaining concrete walls & the dual carriageway quickly & accurately so to form a complete 3d model of the 19th century bridge.

Affording impressive views over London due to it’s high point, the bridge delineates the boundary between Haringey & Islington. It is due to it’s elevated location & span over land, that the structure is also referred to as ‘suicide bridge’.

With this superior level of speed, range & versatility, EA Laser Scanning is able to free-up client’s valuable design time with the quick delivery of accurate survey drawings.

EA Laser Scanning enables fast, accurate surveying of buildings and structures, including remote and difficult-to-access areas such as bridges, roofs and complex built environments.

EA Laser Scanning produces detailed computer generated 3d models of existing buildings and structures, which provides the facility to create unique views and images of the laser scanned architecture and structures.

EA Laser Scanning is ideal for architectural and structural survey requirements.

Measured survey drawings in the form of CAD plans, sections and elevations are developed from the 3d laser scan model.

The world’s first 3d laser scan of Crow Crag

Courtyard View of Crow Cragg

Courtyard View of Crow Crag

EA have produced the world’s first 3d laser scan model of Sleddale Hall aka Crow Crag, which featured in the cult British film Withnail and I.

The celebrated site was laser scanned from various positions for a forthcoming web site, which is to be dedicated to the film classic.

EA Laser Scanning enables fast, accurate surveying of detailed and complex buildings and structures, including remote and difficult to access areas such as roofs, adjacent buildings and complex built environments.

EA Laser Scanning produces detailed computer generated 3d models of existing buildings and structures. One of the major benefits of the 3d model is the facility to create unique views and images of laser scanned subjects, while providing new insights into the architecture.

Measured survey drawings in the form of CAD plans, sections and elevations are developed from the 3d laser scan model.